Univalves

Univalves have a single shell, which may be conical, spiral or flattened in shape. They are also called gastropods ("belly foot"), a reference to the fact that the animals move around on a large soft "foot" extending from an opening in the bottom of the shell. Common univalves are snails, whelks, abalone and limpets.

Brown and black turban snails

Common and abundant between and under rocks on open coasts, turban snails feed on algae.

Red turban snail

The red turban snail has a beautiful flattened pearly "trap-door" or operculum that is often used in Native art on masks and boxes.

Olive shells

The highly polished olive snail lives in the sand, just below the surface. It feeds on the surface of the sand at night.Olive shells were collected and used to decorate clothing, jewelry and...

Hairy Oregon triton

Covered by hairs, and growing to 15 cm (6 in.) this is the one of our largest snails.

Northern (pinto) abalone

Many abalone species have been harvested to low levels and are now rare. Collection of shells and live animals may be prohibited; take pictures only.

Frilled dogwinkle with yellow eggs

Frilled dogwinkles are common and often abundant. The shells vary greatly in colour, often banded, and can be highly frilled to smooth.

Checkered periwinkle and Sitka periwinkle

Checkered and Sitka periwinkles are small shells, often inhabited by hermit crabs and commonly found at the top of the beach and in tidepools.

Dire whelk

Lewis' moon snail

It's a "mollusk-eat-mollusk world"—moon snails leave telltale beveled drill holes in many shells when they attack and feed.

Sand egg collar case

The sand egg collar of the moon snail has been described as resembling a plunger like the type that plumbers use.

Keyhole limpet

Limpets often will bash and bulldoze mussels and barnacles away to clear space on rocks for algae to grow. The limpets then feed from this garden. As a defence against predators, they clamp down...

Giant owl limpet

The largest of our limpets, it grows to 9 cm (3 1/2 in.) long and was harvested for food by First Nations people. This limpet forms a "home scar" worn into the rock.

Finger limpet

Shield limpet

Whitecap limpet

Mask limpet

Cup-and-saucer snail

Wrinkled slippersnails and cup-and-saucer snails looks similar to limpets from the top, but turn these unusual shells over to see the unique shell platforms inside.

Wrinkled slippersnail

Wrinkled slippersnails and cup-and-saucer snails looks similar to limpets from the top, but turn these unusual shells over to see the unique shell platforms inside.

Hoof snail